MCAT and DAT

As part of the admission process, the majority of graduate programs in the U.S. require at least one or more standardized test scores. Universities and colleges in the U.S. have their own admission requirements and each of them accepts different standardized test scores from third-party organizations. Make sure to find out which test scores are required on the website of each institution.

MCAT

The MCAT (Medical College Admission Test) is a standardized test that measures problem-solving, critical thinking, writing skills, knowledge of science concepts, and principles that are required to the study of medicine in the U.S. Only students who are planning to apply to a health professions school are eligible to take the exam.

Components

  1. Biological and Biochemical Foundations of Living Systems
  2. Chemical and Physical Foundations of Biological Systems
  3. Psychological, Social, and Biological Foundations of Behavior
  4. Critical Analysis and Reasoning Skills

Total testing time

7 hours and 30 minutes long, including breaks

Exam type

Multiple choice.

Score reporting

Each of the four sections is scored from a low of 118 to a high of 132, with a midpoint of 125. Scores for the four sections are combined to create a total score. The total score ranges from 472 to 528.

How to study

A list of both free and paid preparation materials can be found here:

https://students-residents.aamc.org/applying-medical-school/taking-mcat-exam/prepare-mcat-exam/

Taking the test

The MCAT is owned and administered by the American Association of Medical Colleges (AAMC). The MCAT is offered worldwide throughout the year. At this moment in time, there are no available test centers in Belgium or Luxembourg. In order to find a test date and to register for taking the test in the United States, you will need to create an account online and follow the instructions on the official website of AAMC.

Costs

Registration fee ranges between 315 and 370 dollars (subject to change). Additional fees might apply.

Required or not

Almost all U.S. medical schools require to submit MCAT exam scores for admission consideration. Please note that competition for admission to American medical school is very intense, even among American students. This means that the chances of being admitted to American medical schools are very slight for international students unless they have completed all of their premedical training in the United States. For more information on medicine studies in the U.S., visit (www.educationusa.be/graduate-studies/specialized-fields/medicine/)

More information

https://students-residents.aamc.org/applying-medical-school/taking-mcat-exam/

 

DAT

The DAT (Dental Admission Test) is a standardized test that measures general academic ability, comprehension of scientific information, and perceptual ability, used for admission to dental schools in the U.S.

Components

  1. Survey of the Natural Sciences
  2. Perceptual Ability
  3. Reading Comprehension
  4. Quantitative Reasoning

Total testing time

4 hours and 30 minutes, including an optional break.

Exam type

Multiple choice.

Score reporting

Scores used in the testing program range from 1 to 30.

How to study

A list of both free and paid preparation materials can be found here:

www.ada.org/en/education-careers/dental-admission-test/test-preparation

Taking the test

The DAT is conducted by the American Dental Association (ADA). The DAT is offered throughout the year by Prometric test centers in the United States. At this moment in time, there are no available test centers in Belgium or Luxembourg. In order to find a test date and to register for taking the test in the United States, you will need to create an account online and follow the instructions on the official website of ADA.

Costs

Registration fee of 475 dollars (subject to change). Additional fees might apply.

Required or not

Almost all U.S. dental schools require to submit DAT exam scores for admission consideration.

More information

www.ada.org/en/education-careers/dental-admission-test

 

Used sources: educationusa.state.gov, aamc.org, ada.org